The Singapore National Gallery & Other Sights

Another day of sightseeing in Singapore.  I decided to have another walk down by the river before making my way over to visit some of the museums that are available in the city.

During my first big walk along the Singapore River, I tried hard to find the statue of Sir Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore.  I walked back and forth over the area where it should have been but never did find it.  It turns out that someone has been keeping Sir Stamford under wraps. Literally.

Photo of the statue of Sir Stamford Raffles in Singapore.  Statue is covered during renovation.

Most of the buildings in the old town area were built by the old British colonial government and have been converted into a variety of museums, art centers, and other facilities.  They are a well preserved reminder of Singapore’s history.

Photo of the Old Parliament building in Singapore. Now called The Arts House At The Old Parliament.

I continued walking till I reached the new Supreme Court and Parliament buildings.  The ultra-modern Supreme court building seems out of place among the historic buildings that surround it. The circular top floor looks as if a spaceship has come down for and landed on the roof.

Photo of the new Singapore Supreme Court building.
Outside view of the Singapore Parliament building.

I back track a bit and head to the National Gallery of Singapore.  It is housed in the old Supreme Court and City Hall.  It is home to the largest collection of Singaporean and South East Asian art. 

Outside view of the Singapore National Gallery.

The art museum has four floors and a roof top complete with garden, restaurant, and a nice view of the Marina Bay Sands and city skyline.

I bought a ticket and followed the instructions of one of the docent on the best way to make my way through the building.  It has an interesting collection that ranges from classic Singaporean paintings to provocative modern art.

A bust of a Singaporean man on display inside the art gallery in Singapore.
Various pieces of artwork on display at Singapore's National Gallery.
Statue of monkey at National Gallery in Singapore.
Modern Art displayed at the Singapore National Gallery

I met another docent who was very friendly and engaged me in some light conversation while also educating me on some of the most valuable pieces in the museum, one of which was picked up at yard sale for $1.

Seeing the art inside the old Supreme Court building was a unique experience as they left much of the beautiful original interior design in place and it seemed to be an extension of the art on display.

Hallway with columns inside the old Singapore Supreme Court building at the National Gallery
Inside the old Singapore Supreme Court building
Inside the old Supreme Court Library at the Singapore National Gallery

 I finish the tour at the roof top, taking in the view.  It looks like a nice place an relax with a drink as the sun sets, however it was a little early in the day for me to partake. 

Inside the Singapore Courtyard at the National Gallery
View of Marina Bay Sands from the top of the National Gallery of Singapore

After visiting the National Gallery, I decide my ankle isn’t sore enough and decide to take a hike on down to the Raffles Hotel.  It’s is a five-star, luxury hotel in a colonial style building. It’s famous for it’s Long Bar, where the Singapore Sling cocktail was invented and the Raffles Doormen who are always Sikh and wearing a uniformed fashioned to look like a colonial style military uniform.

They say it pays to do your research and in this case they would be right.  After the long walk I’m greeted by a big blue barrier telling me the hotel is under renovations. 

Photo of Raffles Hotel behind barrier during renovation.

It wouldn’t open again till August 2019.  At least I wouldn’t get thrown out of the hotel by those mustachioed doormen for drinking one too many Singapore Slings.

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